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L'Accord parfait (copy 1)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016

Accord parfait copy 1

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

40 x 34 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

A Pastoral Scene

Perfect Accord

Perfect Harmony

 

PROVENANCE

New York, Gimpel and Wildenstein; sold after 1903 to William Salomon.

New York, collection of William Salomon (1852-1919; railroad executive and investment banker). His sale, New York, American Art Association, April 4-7, 1923, lot 377:  “JEAN BAPTISTE JOSEPH PATER . . . A PASTORAL SCENE / (Canvas) / Height, 16 inches; width, 13½ inches / (Companion to the preceding) / A GROUP of five figures in a garden in summer time. Seated in the center under a tree, and wearing a white silk dress with white and pink corsage, is a young lady. She is holding a music score and turns to the right toward a blue-clad flute player; on the ground at her feet, and more to the left, is another musician, who, dressed in pink and holding his flageolet, has his back turned to the spectator. At the back, in the middle distance, is a young lady, in a bluish-yellow dress and wearing a blue hat, who is accompanied by a young gallant; he has a red cloak over his shoulder. They are about to walk away into the glade which is revealed in the right background.” The painting was supposedly sold to William Chester for $3,900 according to an annotated sale catalogue in the Frick Art Reference Library. One might well wonder if this was a legitimate sale since the picture appeared just a few years later in the 1928 auction of the collection of Salomon’s widow. The pendant, listed as lot 376 in the 1923 sale, was a copy after Watteau’s Le Conteur and it too was attributed to Pater.

New York, collection of Mrs. William Salomon (Helen Forbes Lewis, d. 1927). Her sale, New York, American Art Association, January 4-7, 1928, lot 764: “JEAN-BAPTISTE JOSEPH PATER . . . French: 1696-1736. . . A PASTORAL SCENE A group of five figures in a garden in summertime.  Seated under a tree is a young lady in a white silk dress with pink and white corsage, holding a music score and turning towards a flautist at her right, clad in blue, who looks over her shoulder. On the ground at her feet is another musician in a rose doublet, holding a flageolet, his back turned to the spectator.  Behind the group appears a young gallant cloaked in red, and accompanied by a young lady with a blue hat, who are strolling away from the spectator, into a glade. Height, 16 inches; width, 13 ½ inches.  Purchased from Gimpel and Wildenstein [See illustration on page 245].Sold for $6,100 to E. Rosenfield.

New York, Wildenstein and Co.; sold to the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Kansas City, MO, in 1934.

Kansas City, MO, William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art (later renamed the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art); deaccessioned in 1986.

New York, Christie’s, January 15, 1986, lot 69: "JEAN BAPTISTE PATER . . . L’ACCORD PARFAIT, after Watteau / oil on canvas / 16¼ x 13½ in. (41.2 x 34.3 cm.) LITERATURE / J. Ingersoll-Smouse, Pater, 1928, p. 85, fig. 173 / $6,000-8,000.”

Paris, Galerie Segoura, c. 1991, attributed to Jean Baptiste Pater; sold to an American collector according to an annotated photograph seen in a private Paris archive.

 

  EXHIBITIONS

Springfield, Museum, Opening Exhibition (1933), cat. 61 (by Watteau, The Perfect Accord or Perfect Harmony [Painting after Watteau], lent by Wildenstein & Co.).

South Hadley, Mount Holyoke, The Eye Listens (1950), cat. 35 (by Pater, Perfect Harmony, lent by the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art).

Kansas City, Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Century of Mozart (1956), cat. 82 (by Pater, L'Accord Parfait).

New York, Wildenstein, Paris—New York (1977), cat. 47 (by Pater, L’Accord Parfait, lent by the Nelson Gallery-Atkins Museum, Kansas City).

 
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ingersoll-Smouse, Pater (1928), cat. 594.

Kansas City, Nelson Collection (1940), 40, 46.

Kansas City, Nelson Collection (1949), 60.

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), under cat. 120.

Davies, French School (1957), 223, under cat. 2962.

Kansas City, Nelson-Atkins Museum, Handbook (1959), 261.

Macchia and Montagni, L’opera completa di Watteau (1968), under cat. 196.

Coe, “Baroque and Rococo” (1972), 538.

 

 

REMARKS

This copy appears to have been based directly on Watteau’s original painting and not the Baron engraving. The colors used by the copyist correspond to those of the picture now in Los Angeles.

The notion that this copy was executed by Pater extends back at least a century. It was accepted by Ingersoll-Smouse, and apparently is still maintained today. Coe claimed that the copy was executed c. 1727 when it “passed from its first owner to Jean de Jullienne, who employed Pater as copyist.” We should be wary of assigning the painting to Pater. There is a prevailing tendency to ascribe copies after Watteau to Pater and other of his satellites despite the lack of documentary or visual justification. There certainly is no documentation that Pater was employed by Jullienne as a copyist.

According to Ingersoll-Smouse, this picture was engraved by Charles Nicolas Cochin with slight differences in the background foliage. There is no such engraving by Cochin; see Roux, Fonds français (1930-77), 4: 594-661, esp. 603-09, cat. 31-47. Ingersoll-Smouse probably was referring to the engraving by Bernard Baron, although that print, after all, copies the painting now in Los Angeles.

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 2)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


Accord parfait copy 2

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

54.6 x 45.7 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

A Musical Party

 

PROVENANCE

London, collection of Cromartie Sutherland-Leveson, 4th duke of Sutherland. His sale, London, Christie’s, July 11, 1913, lot 37: “A. WATTEAU . . . A MUSICAL PARTY  A garden scene with a lady holding a book of music, while a gentleman, seated opposite her, plays a guitar: other figures by a fountain 21½  by 18 in.” Sold for £567 to Nicholson according to an annotated catalogue in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Adhémar misrecorded this sale as “collection S.,” July 27, 1913.

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hannover, Watteau (1888), 99.

Staley, Watteau (1902), 66.

Zimmermann, Watteau (1912), 137, 181.

Dacier, Vuaflart, and Hérold, Jean de Jullienne et les graveurs (1921-29), 3: cat. 23.

Réau, “Watteau” (1928), under cat. 118.

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), under cat.120.

Davies, French School (1957), 223, under cat. 2962.

Macchia and Montagni, L’opera completa di Watteau (1968), under cat. 196.

 

REMARKS

Although this painting was given to Watteau while in the Duke of Sutherland’s collection, most critics have been less optimistic. Goncourt thought this version “weak,” while Hannover and Zimmerman rightly considered it a copy. Dacier, Vuaflart, and Hérold evasively listed both the Edmond de Rothschild (now Waddesdon Manor) version and the Duke of Sutherland's versions as originals.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 3)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


Accord parfait copy 3


London, National Gallery, inv. NG 2962.

Oil on canvas

27.3 x 22.9 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Perfect Harmony

 

PROVENANCE

London, collection of Lord Henry Seymour. His sale, Paris, Hôtel Drouot, February 13-14, 1860, lot 126: WATTEAU . . . L’accord parfait. Gravé. H., 0,35 c; L., 0,28.” Bought by Van Cuyk for Sir Richard Wallace. The annotated copy of the catalogue in the Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie has this lot selling for only 630 francs. In contrast, lot 113, which was listed under Pater’s name but was believed by buyers to be a Watteau, sold for 9,000 francs. Curiously, the annotated copy of the catalogue in the Frick Art Reference Library is annotated with the price and buyers’ names for almost all lots in the sale but not for L’Accord parfait, suggesting that Van Cuyk kept his mission secret.

Paris, collection of Sir Richard Wallace, 4th Marquess of Hertford (1818-1890). Bequeathed to his widow, Julie-Amélie-Charlotte Castelnau (1819-1897).

Paris, Lady Wallace collection. Mentioned in the Wallaces' rue Lafitte apartment in 1912 (see Ingamells, Hertford Mawson Letters, 389, no. 146). Bequeathed by her to Lord Wallace’s secretary, John Murray Scott.

London, collection of Sir John Murray Scott (1847-1912). Donated in 1914 to the National Gallery, London.

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

London, National Gallery, Illustrations Continental Schools (1937), 395.

Davies, French School (1950), pl. 116.

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), under cat. 120.

Davies, French School (1957), 223, cat. 2962.

Ingamells, Hertford Mawson Letters (1981), 389.

London, National Gallery, Catalogue (1986), no. 2962.

Robert and Tupinier-Barrillon, "Galerie Seymour" (1999), cat. 139.

Vogtherr, Watteau at the Wallace Collection (2011), 144-45.

 

REMARKS

Presently there is agreement that this painting, once attributed to Watteau himself, is only a copy. As late as 1937 the National Gallery called it “studio of Watteau,” but even that claim has been modified since there is no reason to believe that it was done in Watteau’s shop. The 1986 catalogue describes it as a copy after Watteau. The colors of this version correspond to Watteau’s original painting as well as to several of the painted copies, suggesting that it was based on such a source and not the Baron engraving.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 4)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


Accord parfait copy 4

 

Waddesdon, Waddesdon Manor, inv. 2372.

Oil on panel

37.4 x 29.1 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Le Concert

Le Joueur de flûte

Perfect Accord

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, Baron James de Rothschild (1792-1868); by descent to his son, Edmond de Rothschild.

Paris, collection of Edmond de Rothschild (1845-1934); by descent to his son, James de Rothschild.

Waddesdon, Collection of James de Rothschild (1878-1957); bequeathed to Waddesdon, Rothschild Collection, in 1957.

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Zimmermann, Watteau (1912), 23, 181, under cat. 137.

Dacier, Vuaflart, and Hérold, Jean de Jullienne et les graveurs (1921-29), 3: under cat. 23.

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), cat. 120.

Davies, French School (1957), under cat. 2962.

“Munificent Rothschild Bequest” (1957), 41.

Levey, “French and Italian Pictures” (1959), 57.


 

REMARKS

According to various old paper labels on the back of the painting, the picture was inventoried at different times as Le Concert, Le Joueur de flûte, and L’Accord parfait. It presently is catalogued as The Perfect Accord.

Dacier, Vuaflart, and Hérold listed the Waddesdon picture (then still in the Paris collecton of Edmond de Rothschild) and the Duke of Sutherland's version as though both were originals by Watteau. Davies and Adhémar considered the Waddesdon version to be a copy of lesser quality.

X-rays taken by the Courtauld Institute in the 1950s revealed that this composition was painted over the top half of a still life with flowers.

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 5)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


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Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

38.1 x 30.5 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

L’Intérieur d’un parc

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, sale, Verrier, LeRouge, etc., collections, March 12ff, 1782, lot 117: “IDEM. [ANTOINE WATTEAU] . . . L’intérieur d’un Parc, sur le devant duquel est une femme assise & tenant un livre de musique, pendant qu’un homme près d’elle l’accompagne avec sa flute: trois autres figures sont auprès d’eux. Le fond est terminé par des masses d’arbres. Hauteur 15 pouces, largeur 12 pouc. T.” Sold for 80.1 livres according to an annotated catalogue in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. 

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Goncourt, Catalogue raisonné (1875), cat. 97.

Dacier, Vuaflart, and Hérold, Jean de Jullienne et les graveurs  (1921-29), 3: cat. 23.

Réau, “Watteau” (1928), under cat. 118.

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), under cat. 120.

Macchia and Montagni, L’opera completa di Watteau (1968), under cat. 196.

 

REMARKS

Despite Edmond de Goncourt’s warning about the exemplars of L’Accord parfait sold in 1778 and 1782 (“La même composition, si ce n’est pas le même tableau . . .”), most twentieth-century scholars have
presumed that the two works were one and the same. Yet, while the painting sold in 1778 proves to be the autograph version by Watteau, now in the Getty Museum, there is reason to believe that the picture sold in March 1782 was only a copy. It differs from the original in two distinctive aspects. First, it is slightly larger. The original Watteau was measured at twelve by nine pouces or thirteen by ten pouces, whereas the 1782 picture was seemingly larger at fifteen by twelve pouces. Secondly, the authentic Watteau is on a wooden panel whereas the March 1782 picture was supposedly on canvas. Each of these differences might be considered sufficiently slight to overlook, but together they signal that caution should prevail. Moreover, and more damning, when the original version sold just four years earlier, it brought 930 livres. The canvas sold in March 1782 brought only 80.1 livres, a notably lower price. This is certainly not the proper price level for an authentic Watteau. The 1782 picture may be one of the many extant replicas, but it is not possible to identify which one.

Even though catalogued by Lebrun, who was generally a well-informed and reliable auctioneer, other lots in this same sale are also suspicious. The so-called Watteau listed as lot 116, Une Femme nue au bain, may well be one of many Pater scenes with bathing women that were sold under Watteau’s name in the eighteenth century.


         

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 6)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


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Whereabouts unknown

Medium unknown

Measurements unknown

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Concert champêtre

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, Place de la Bourse, anonymous sale, March 12-13, 1839, lot 45: “Le même [WATTEAU]. Concert champêtre: un homme joue de la flûte, assis près d’une jeune fille qui tient un cahier de musique; à ses pieds est placé un jeune homme tenant une guitare; derrrière eux un homme et une femme s’entretiennent ensemble.”

 

REMARKS

Given the lack of measurements and any indication of its provenance, it is impossible to identify this picture with any exactitude. Nonetheless, it is tempting to link it with the version of L’Accord parfait that was on the Paris market just ten years later, in 1849 (our copy 7).

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 7)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


 

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Whereabouts unknown

Medium unknown

Measurements unknown

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Concert dans un parc

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, place de la Bourse, anonymous sale, May 16, 1849, lot 26: “WATTEAU. Sujet du même genre [Le Concert dans un parc]. Dans ce charmant tableau, une jeune femme chante. Elle est accompagnée par un jeune homme sur la flûte; un troisième personnage assis à terre tient une mandoline; derrière, deux autres figures s’éloignent vers le fond du parc.”

REMARKS

Although Dacier, Vuaflart, and Hérold attached the provenance of Watteau's original version to this copy, this seems unlikely. Without measurements and provenance, the copy cannot be linked definitively with any of the other versions of the composition then in France. However, there is a good possibility it may have been the one sold in Paris in 1839 (our copy 6) and perhaps the one that later entered the collection of the Duke of Sutherland or James de Rothschild (our copies 2 and 4). These paintings lack provenances earlier than the mid-nineteenth century.

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 8)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


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Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

34 x 26 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Le Duo

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ingersoll-Smouse, Pater (1928), cat. 595.

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), under cat. 120.

Davies, French School (1957), under cat. 2962.

Macchia and Montagni, L’opera completa di Watteau (1968), under cat. 196.

 

REMARKS

This copy after L’Accord parfait is so far untraceble. Ingersoll-Smouse referred to it with great specificity, as appearing in a London sale, March 25, 1926, lot 124, and described as Le Duo, attributed to Pater. Yet no appropriate auction catalogue has been located. Ingersoll-Smouse’s reference was repeated by Adhémar and by Macchia and Montagni. Adhémar added the name of a subsequent owner, “Murray,” yet she did not specify the owner's given name or city of residence, making it almost impossible to identify the person. Could she have meant Lord Murray of Edinburgh, the owner of Watteau’s Fêtes venitiennes? More probably she intended John Murray Scott, the owner of our copy 3, but that painting went to the National Gallery in 1914 and thus could not have been in the putative 1926 sale. Adhémar was often confused by American and English elements of provenance.

Ingersoll-Smouse vehemently declared, “Ce mauvais petit tableau n’est pas de Pater.” Although no image is available, it can be presumed that, provided that there was such a painting, it was just one of the many anonymous copies after Watteau’s composition.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 9)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


Accord parfait copy 9

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

73 x 92 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Assemblée galante dans un parc

Musiciens dans un parc
           

PROVENANCE

Paris, Hôtel Drouot (Boisgirard), November 23, 2001, lot 6: “Philippe Mercier (1689-1760) Assemblée galante dans un parc / huile sur toile / 73 x 92 cm / €18 294 / 22 867 – 120.000/150.000 F / voir la reproduction ci-dessus.” Bought in.

Paris, Hôtel Drouot (SCP Digard Pestel-Debord), June 25, 2010, lot 42: “ECOLE FRANCAISE DU XIXe SIÈCLE, D’APRÈS JEAN ANTOINE WATTEAU / L ‘accord parfait Toile 73,5 x 92 cm Reprise avec variantes (présence d’un paysage élargi dans notre version) du tableau conservé dans une collection particulière à Londres (voir E. Camesasca, Tout l’oeuvre peint de Watteau, Paris, 1970, no 196, reproduit)." Bought in.

Paris, Hôtel Drouot (SCP Digard Pestel-Debord), November 30, 2011, lot 30: “ECOLE FRANCAISE du XIXe siècle, d’après Jean Antoine WATTEAU / L ‘accord parfait Toile 73,5 x 92 cm Reprise avec variantes (présence d’un paysage élargi dans notre version) du tableau conservé dans une collection particulière à Londres (voir E. Camesasca, Tout l’oeuvre peint de Watteau, Paris, 1970, no 196). “ Sold for €2,200 plus premium.

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ferré, Watteau (1972), cat. P42.

 

REMARKS

This picture was catalogued by Ferré in 1972, seemingly as a Watteau but with no information about its provenance, measurements, etc. Although presented in 2001 as a work by Philippe Mercier, the painting has nothing in common with the style of that Watteau satellite. Its more recent description as an anonymous copy after Watteau is more appropriate. It is not a direct copy but an adaptation of L’Accord parfait that repeats the compacted group of five figures from Watteau’s composition but senselessly places them in an unrelated, extensive landscape setting. Although this picture does not preserve the integrity of Watteau’s composition, the costumes have essentially the same colors as those in the original and in several copies.

           

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 10)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


 

Accord parfait copy 10

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

87.6 x 104.8 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

L’Aubade dans le parc

Elegant Figures in a Park Playing Music

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, Hôtel Drouot-Montaigne (Ader Picard Tajan), April 25, 1989, lot 152: “François OCTAVIEN (Rome 1695-Paris 1736) / L’Aubade dans le parc / Toile / 87,5 x 105 cm. / 60 000 / 80 000.”

Paris, Galerie Delvaille, c. 1990-91, presented as a work of François Octavien.

New York, private collection.

New York, Sotheby’s, May 22, 1997, lot 89: “Attributed to Philip Mercier (1689-1760). ELEGANT FIGURES IN A PARK PLAYING MUSIC / oil on canvas / 34½ by 41¼ in.  87.6 by 104.8 cm. The present work relates to a composition, in reverse, of a painting by Antoine Watteau, now part of the Iveagh Bequest, Kenwood House, London $40,000-60,000.” Bought in.

New York, Sotheby’s, May 21, 1998 (“Property from an Estate”), lot 211: “Attributed to Philip Mercier (1689-1760) / ELEGANT FIGURES IN A PARK PLAYING MUSIC / oil on canvas / 34½ by 41¼ in.  87.6 by 104.8 cm. The present work relates to a composition, in reverse, of a painting by Antoine Watteau, now part of the Iveagh Bequest, Kenwood House, London. $20,000-30,000.” Sold for $25,300.

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hayot, "Biennale des antiquaires" (1990), 54.

"Marché de l'art," L’Objet d’art (1991), 29.

 

REMARKS

Despite the attempted attributions to Octavien and Mercier, the picture shares nothing with those Watteau satellites. Instead, it is an adaptation of L’Accord parfait in which the elements of Watteau’s originally vertical landscape were reconfigured into a horizontal format, and the places of the five figures were shuffled to accommodate them to the new horizontal space.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 11)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


Accord parfait copy 11

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

65.5 x 81 cm

 

PROVENANCE

Brussels, Cornette de Saint-Cyr, June 22, 2011, lot 66: “Ecole FRANCAISE du XVIIIème siècle, suiveur d’Antoine WATTEAU / L’accord parfait / Toile, agrandie dans la partie supérieure  / 65,5 x 81 cm / Usures / Reprise du tableau d’Antoine Watteau  conservé au Los Angeles County Museum of Art  (Panneau de châtaignier, 35,5 x 28 cm), voir la catalogue de l’exposition Watteau et la fête galante, Valenciennes, musée des Beaux-Arts, 2004, reproduit fig. 56. / 3 000 / 4 000 €.” Bought in.

Brussels, Cornette de Saint-Cyr, December 14, 2011, lot 6: “Ecole FRANCAISE du XVIIIème siècle, suiveur d’Antoine WATTEAU / L’accord parfait Toile agrandie dans la partie supérieure  65,5 x 81 cm Usures  Reprise du tableau d’Antoine Watteau conservé au Los Angeles County Museum of Art  (Panneau de châtaignier, 35,5 x 28 cm), voir  la catalogue de l’exposition Watteau et la fête galante, Valenciennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts, 2004.” Bought in, despite a lowered estimate of €2-3,000.

 

REMARKS

As the rendering of the faces reveals, the copyist responsible for this picture had a distinctive, somewhat unpleasant style.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 12)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016

Accord parfait copy 12

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

35 x 28 cm

 

ALTERNATIVE TITLES

Le Concert champêtre

 

PROVENANCE

Geneva, Hôtel des ventes, March 12, 2008, lot 1293: “Antoine Watteau . . . ,
école de. Le concert champêtre, huile sur toile, XIXe s., 35 x 28 cm. 3 000-4 000.”
Bought in.

Paris, Hôtel Drouot (Millon & Associés), March 21, 2011, lot 83: “Ecole FRANCAISE du XVIIIe siècle, d’après Antoine WATTEAU / Le concert champêtre, dit l’accord parfait / Toile. 35 x 28 cm. / (Restaurations) / CT 1800 / 2200€ / Reprise d’une composition de Watteau conservée dans une collection particulière, Londres. (Ce lot est en importation temporaire).” Bought in.

 

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 13)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


Accord parfait copy 13

 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

55 x 45 cm

 

PROVENANCE

Naples, Casa d’Aste Blindarte, May 20, 2008, lot 27, as by a follower of Jean Antoine Watteau. Estimated at €3,000-4,000. Bought in.

 

REMARKS

Despite the claim that this picture was signed (with Watteau's name?), the work is but a copy.

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 14)

Entered March 2014; revised September 2016


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Whereabouts unknown

Materials unknown

Measurements unknown

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, collection of Victor Alvin-Beaumont (b. 1862; artist, dealer, critc), c. 1930-50.

 

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adhémar, Watteau (1950), under cat. 120.

Macchia and Montagni, L’opera completa di Watteau (1968), under cat. 196.

 

REMARKS

Adhémar is the only scholar to refer to this version of L’Accord parfait (except that, as always, her text was subsequently parroted by Macchia and Montagni). Unfortunately, she gave no information about the picture, neither its size nor medium. Alvin-Beaumont published some of his Watteau pictures in his polemical writings on the artist, but he seems not to have presented this work publicly. Conceivably, his version is one that we have catalogued here separately.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 15)

Entered July 2014; revised August 2015


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Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas, or paper mounted on canvas

34.5 x 27.5 cm

 

PROVENANCE

Paris, Hôtel Drouot, February 16, 1981, lot 119: “WATTEAU (École d’Antoine) . . . L’ACCORD PARFAIT. Toile. (Peut-être papier marouflé). Cadre en bois sculpté. Haut. 0,345 m; Larg. 0,275 m. Répétition ancienne du tableau de Watteau.”

 

REMARKS

Despite its relatively recent appearance on the art market, no image of the painting is available.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 16)

Entered November 2015


 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

40.5 x 30.7 cm

 

PROVENANCE

Modena, collection of Alceste Giacomazzi, c. 1957.

 

REMARKS

This copy of Watteau’s composition, painted after Baron’s engraving, is known through a discolored photograph and correspondence on file at the Service de documentation, Département des peintures, Musée du Louvre.

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 17)

Entered February 2017


 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

46 x 37 cm

 

PROVENANCE

Versailles, Palais des congrès, December 8, 1968, listed under the name of Philippe Mercier.

 

REMARKS

Although it was erroniously presented as work of Philippe Mercier, this picture is just another anonymous copy after Watteau.

 

 

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L'Accord parfait (copy 18)

Entered February 2017


 

Whereabouts unknown

Oil on canvas

Measurements unknown

 

REMARKS

This picture is known to me through a photograph in the Getty Research Institute. The photo bears no annotations regarding size, provenance, or attribution. The many losses of paint around the edges as well as in the main field reveal all too clearly its poor condition.